programming

Creating PDF Reports from HTML using Dotliquid (Markup) for templates and WkHtmlToXSharp for printing PDF


The problem

Our application needs to create PDF reports. The solution tries to accomplish the following ideas:
– No cost (a free solutions)
– Easy to modify style. (e.g, depending on the change it may not be required to redeploy the binary, and since it is HTML most people knows the basics of it).

REMARKS

– You must review the limitations of the WkHtmlToXSharp wrapper at https://github.com/pruiz/WkHtmlToXSharp .
– The wrapper WkHtmlToXSharp does not expose all the native functionality, thus. If you need native functionality, you are likely to have two options: 1) Do it with another library 2) Fork the code at GitHub, expose what you need, and update your library WkHtmlToXSharp with your modifications.
– DotLiquid Markup takes a close approach in regards to security, thus you have to indicate which items are accessible to it templating system, if security is not a major concern, Razor Engine will work equally or better.

The Solution

The solution follows the following high-level overview of the workflow:

– A data source will provide an object which will be the only data source for our report. On this step it is going to be use dynamic feature of C# and System.Dynamic.ExpandObject because they can produce objects wit
– The templating system will use the data source and a template file(s) to produce a HTML.
– The generated HTML will be prided to the PDF Printer in order to create a neat PDF document

If you want to see the code without much explanation, then see it at GitHub in https://github.com/hmadrigal/playground-dotnet/tree/master/MsDotNet.PdfGeneration

Dot Liquid Markup (Templating System)

In here is worth to mention that the templating system is DotLiquid Markup There are more templating systems. A really good one was Razor Engine which is based on the Razor Syntax when creating Web Applications in .NET. Why did I select DotLiquid over Razor Engine, it was a matter of security. Razor Engine will let you access most of the .NET framework, which I think it’s very convenient but less secure since there are file handling, db access and other this can be done with .NET Framework. On the other hand Dot Liquid uses a its custom syntax to specify the template and it is also closed by default, to access specific features, these items (such class classes or types) must be explicitly added, by default most common types and methods are accessible in DotLiquid.
NOTE: Razor Engine does have support for isolating execution by creating an AppDomain, but I simply didn’t want to take that path.

RazorEngine as well as DotLiquidMarkup are well documented although the latter you will find more specific documentation for the Ruby version than the CSharp port.

Most of the Ruby documentation for Liquid Template is applicable to DotLiquid (obviously using C# instead of Ruby).
http://www.rubydoc.info/gems/liquid/
http://liquidmarkup.org/
https://docs.shopify.com/themes/liquid-documentation/basics

At last DotLiquidMarkup is extensible, in our example we use some extensions (aka filters, since extensions can be of different types) for producing Base64 encoding, Html encoding and ToLocalUri.

DotLiquidMarkup is accessible thru Nuget At https://www.nuget.org/packages/DotLiquid/

WkHtmlToXSharp ( wkhtmltopdf ) (HTML To PDF Printer)

WkHtmlToXSharp is a wrapper for the native open-source library wkhtmltopdf. The native library is quite flexible and robust and it is available in Windows and Unix-like systems. The wrapper WkHtmlToXSharp does not expose all the funcionality of the native library, thus if you need some functionality you are likely to have two options:
1- Fork the project at GitHub, add your customization, and use the your library. (You can do the pull-request if you want to share the changes)
2- Once the PDF is generated, you could use other third party library to perform modifications.

To see the wrapper limitations and capabilities go to
https://github.com/pruiz/WkHtmlToXSharp
To see native library capabilities go to
http://wkhtmltopdf.org/
http://wkhtmltopdf.org/libwkhtmltox/pagesettings.html
https://madalgo.au.dk/~jakobt/wkhtmltoxdoc/wkhtmltopdf-0.9.9-doc.html

The library is accessible thru nuget
https://www.nuget.org/packages/WkHtmlToXSharp/ (Main)
https://www.nuget.org/packages/WkHtmlToXSharp.Win32/ (Win32)
https://www.nuget.org/packages/WkHtmlToXSharp.Win64/ (Win64)

Because of a native library is being used, there are platform specific wrappers. The wrapper already includes the native library, and it decompressed it when the application starts up. This increases the size of the app in memory (and disk), but simplyfies deployment and distribution (A fair trade-off).

Dynamic C#

I hope that by using dynamic the template engine will have the enough independence (and simplicity) in the data source. Normally data sources for reports are unknown structures. You only define the structure when somebody asks you to create the report. In scenarios like the previously explained, dynamic fits well, since we can populate our data objects specifying “on-the-fly” properties without much code or complexity.
See Dynamic in C# 4 for more details. For a more advance use of dynamic see http://blogs.msdn.com/b/csharpfaq/archive/2009/10/19/dynamic-in-c-4-0-creating-wrappers-with-dynamicobject.aspx

Show me the code

Rather than me copying and pasting all project’s code, I’ll share what I consider are the most relevant classes and explain their goals.
The first code, it is just a fake data layer, which provides information for the report to consume. The code is in project MsDotNet.PdfGeneration.Data.

using FakeData;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Dynamic;
using System.Linq;

namespace PdfGeneration.Data
{
    public class DataProvider
    {
        public dynamic GetReportData()
        {
            // Generating employee list
            var employees = Enumerable
                .Range(0, NumberData.GetNumber(10, 50))
                .Select(i =>
                   {
                       dynamic newEmployee = new ExpandoObject();
                       newEmployee.BirthDate = DateTimeData.GetDatetime(new DateTime(1973, 1, 1), new DateTime(1997, 12, 1));
                       newEmployee.FirstName = NameData.GetFirstName();
                       newEmployee.LastName = NameData.GetSurname();
                       newEmployee.Company = NameData.GetCompanyName();
                       newEmployee.Email = NetworkData.GetEmail();
                       newEmployee.PhoneNumber = PhoneNumberData.GetInternationalPhoneNumber();
                       newEmployee.Address = string.Format("{0} {1} {2}\n{3},{4} {5}", PlaceData.GetStreetName(), PlaceData.GetStreetNumber(), PlaceData.GetAddress(), PlaceData.GetCity(), PlaceData.GetState(), PlaceData.GetZipCode());
                       newEmployee.PersonalQuote = TextData.GetSentences(5);
                       // NOTE: Even though ExpandoObject is compatible with IDictionary<string,object>,
                       //       The template engine only accepts Dictionary<string,object>
                       return new Dictionary<string, object>(newEmployee);
                   })
                .ToList();

            dynamic reportData = new ExpandoObject();
            reportData.Employees = employees;
            return reportData;
        }
    }
}

Once we the data, we should pass it to our Template System (DotLiquid). The template system has three components:
1. The template file(s) (assets files and dot liquid files). (These are at the project MsDotNet.PdfGeneration.Templating
2. The Data. It’s generated by the project MsDotNet.PdfGeneration.Data.
3. The codes which joins data and template files to produce the output. The code for this is at MsDotNet.PdfGeneration.Templating
In this case, first lets take a look at each of them:

{% assign dateFormat = 'MM/dd/yyyy' %}
<!DOCTYPE html>

<html lang="en" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8" />
    <title></title>
    <link href="{{ "Assets/bootstrap.css" | ToLocalUri }}" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
    <style type="text/css">

        @font-face {
            font-family: 'FontAwesome';
            src: local('FontAwesome'), url(data:font/woff;base64,{{ "Assets/fontawesome-webfont.woff" | ToBase64 }}) format('woff');
        }

        @media print {

            .page-break-after {
                page-break-after: always;
            }

            .page-break-before {
                page-break-before: always;
            }
        }

        body {
            height: 297mm;
            width: 210mm;
            margin-left: auto;
            margin-right: auto;
        }
        
    </style>
    <link href="{{ "Assets/fontawesome.css" | ToLocalUri }}" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
</head>
<body>
    <h1>Report Sample</h1>
    <table class="table table-bordered">
    {% for employee in Employees %}
        <tr>
            <td>{{ employee.FirstName | HtmlEncode }} {{ employee.LastName | HtmlEncode }}</td>
            <td>{{ employee.Email | HtmlEncode }}</td>
            <td>{{ employee.PhoneNumber | HtmlEncode }}</td>
            <td>{{ employee.Address | HtmlEncode }}</td>
        </tr>
    {% endfor %}
    </table>
</body>
</html>

Other than the template file, it uses a CSS for styling and woff to provide a custom font. note that HTML syntax is standard, and we can add Dot Liquid syntax into the HTML file to support dynamic content. Please refer to Liquid Market syntax for understanding it.
In the template we are using custom filters,
HtmlEncode: Makes sure that the output is encoded to be displayed in HTML.
ToLocalUri: Converts a given relative path to an absolute path.
ToBase64: Encodes the input (a file or a text) to Base64, This is useful when using Data Uri ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_URI_scheme ). Data Uri are used to embed resources into the HTML, for example images, fonts, etc.

The code which handles the DotLiquidMarkup is at MsDotNet.PdfGeneration.Templating

using System;
using System.Linq;

namespace PdfGeneration.Templating.Extensibility
{
    public static class CustomFilters
    {
        public static string HtmlEncode(object input)
        {
            var htmlInput = input == null ? null : System.Net.WebUtility.HtmlEncode(input.ToString());
            return htmlInput;
        }

        public static string ToBase64(object input, string directory = null)
        {
            directory = directory ?? AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory;
            byte[] buffer = null;
            var inputAsFilePath = (input as string) ?? string.Empty;
            inputAsFilePath = System.IO.Path.Combine(directory, inputAsFilePath);
            if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(inputAsFilePath) && System.IO.File.Exists(inputAsFilePath))
            {
                buffer = System.IO.File.ReadAllBytes(inputAsFilePath);
            }
            else if (input is System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<byte>)
            {
                var inputAsBytes = input as System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<byte>;
                buffer = inputAsBytes.ToArray();
            }
            else
            {
                buffer = System.Text.Encoding.Default.GetBytes(input.ToString());
            }

            if (buffer == null)
                return string.Empty;

            var base64String = Convert.ToBase64String(buffer);
            return base64String;
        }

        public static string ToLocalUri(object input, string directory = null)
        {
            directory = directory ?? AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory;
            var inputAsFilePath = (input as string) ?? string.Empty;
            inputAsFilePath = System.IO.Path.Combine(directory, inputAsFilePath);
            var filePathUri = new Uri(inputAsFilePath);
            return filePathUri.ToString();
        }
    }
}
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace PdfGeneration.Templating
{
    public class TemplateRender
    {
        public TemplateRender()
        {
            Initialize();
        }

        private void Initialize()
        {
            DotLiquid.Template.RegisterFilter(typeof(Extensibility.CustomFilters));
            DotLiquid.Liquid.UseRubyDateFormat = false;
            DotLiquid.Template.NamingConvention = new DotLiquid.NamingConventions.CSharpNamingConvention();
        }

        public void AddKnownType(params Type[] visibleTypes)
        {
            visibleTypes = visibleTypes ?? Enumerable.Empty<Type>().ToArray();
            foreach (var type in visibleTypes)
            {
                var typeProperties = type.GetProperties();
                DotLiquid.Template.RegisterSafeType(type, typeProperties.Select(property => property.Name).ToArray());
            }
        }

        public void RenderTemplate(string templateFilePath, string htmlFilePath, dynamic model)
        {
            using (Stream htmlStream = new FileStream(htmlFilePath, FileMode.OpenOrCreate))
                RenderTemplate(templateFilePath, htmlStream, model);
        }

        public void RenderTemplate(string templateFilePath, Stream htmlStream, dynamic model, bool hasToLeaveStreamOpen = false)
        {
            using (TextWriter htmlTextWriter = new StreamWriter(htmlStream, Encoding.Default, 4096, hasToLeaveStreamOpen))
            {
                RenderTemplate(templateFilePath, htmlTextWriter, model);
            }
        }

        public void RenderTemplate(string templateFilePath, TextWriter htmlTextWriter, dynamic model)
        {
            var template = DotLiquid.Template.Parse(File.ReadAllText(templateFilePath));
            var templateRenderParameters = new DotLiquid.RenderParameters();
            var directorySeparator = Path.DirectorySeparatorChar.ToString();
            var templateDirectory = Path.GetFullPath(
                (templateFilePath.StartsWith(directorySeparator, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) || templateFilePath.StartsWith("." + directorySeparator, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
                ? Path.GetDirectoryName(Path.Combine(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory, templateFilePath))
                : Path.GetDirectoryName(templateFilePath)
            );

            DotLiquid.Template.FileSystem = new DotLiquid.FileSystems.LocalFileSystem(templateDirectory);
            templateRenderParameters.LocalVariables =
                model is System.Dynamic.ExpandoObject
                ? DotLiquid.Hash.FromDictionary(model as IDictionary<string, object>)
                : DotLiquid.Hash.FromAnonymousObject(model)
            ;
            template.Render(htmlTextWriter, templateRenderParameters);
            htmlTextWriter.Flush();
        }
    }
}

Now, we have the data , and some logic which creates an HTML based on a given data. The next component is at the project MsDotNet.PdfGeneration.PdfPrinting. In here an HTML is received and converted by the low level library as PDF.

using System;
using WkHtmlToXSharp;

namespace PdfGeneration.PdfPrinting
{
    // See more information about the WkHtmlTox
    // http://wkhtmltopdf.org/libwkhtmltox/pagesettings.html
    // https://madalgo.au.dk/~jakobt/wkhtmltoxdoc/wkhtmltopdf-0.9.9-doc.html

    public class HtmlToPdfPrinter
    {
        static HtmlToPdfPrinter()
        {

            WkHtmlToXLibrariesManager.Register(new Win32NativeBundle());
            WkHtmlToXLibrariesManager.Register(new Win64NativeBundle());
        }

        public void Print(string htmlFilePath, string pdfFilePath)
        {
            using (System.IO.Stream pdfStreamWriter = System.IO.File.OpenWrite(pdfFilePath))
            using (var multiplexingConverter = GetDefaultConverter(
                setUpAction: m => m.ObjectSettings.Page = new Uri(htmlFilePath).ToString()
            ))
            {
                var pdfBytes = multiplexingConverter.Convert();
                pdfStreamWriter.Write(pdfBytes, 0, pdfBytes.Length);
                pdfStreamWriter.Flush();
            }
        }

        public void Print(System.IO.Stream htmlStream, System.IO.Stream pdfStream)
        {
            using (System.IO.TextReader htmlReader = new System.IO.StreamReader(htmlStream))
            {
                Print(htmlReader, pdfStream);
            }
        }

        public void Print(System.IO.TextReader htmlReader, System.IO.Stream pdfStream)
        {
            var htmlContent = htmlReader.ReadToEnd();
            Print(htmlContent, pdfStream);
        }

        public void Print(string htmlContent, System.IO.Stream pdfStream)
        {
            using (var multiplexingConverter = GetDefaultConverter())
            {
                var pdfBytes = multiplexingConverter.Convert(htmlContent);
                pdfStream.Write(pdfBytes, 0, pdfBytes.Length);
                pdfStream.Flush();
            }
        }

        private IHtmlToPdfConverter GetDefaultConverter(Action<IHtmlToPdfConverter> setUpAction = null)
        {
            var multiplexingConverter = new MultiplexingConverter();
            multiplexingConverter.ObjectSettings.Web.PrintMediaType = true;
            multiplexingConverter.GlobalSettings.Margin.Top = "1.25cm";
            multiplexingConverter.GlobalSettings.Margin.Bottom = "1.25cm";
            multiplexingConverter.GlobalSettings.Margin.Left = "1.25cm";
            multiplexingConverter.GlobalSettings.Margin.Right = "1.25cm";

            multiplexingConverter.ObjectSettings.Load.BlockLocalFileAccess = false;
            multiplexingConverter.ObjectSettings.Web.LoadImages = true;
            multiplexingConverter.ObjectSettings.Web.PrintMediaType = true;

            if (setUpAction != null)
                setUpAction(multiplexingConverter);
            return multiplexingConverter;
        }
    }
}

NOTE Please notice that WkHtmlToXSharp requires you to register the native dll, to make sure this happens once the previous code does it at the static constructor.

Now we have everything we need to generate PDF report. A goal partial on this example, was to hide the libraries, in a way that you could replace components (e.g. you want to use razor engine instead of DotLiquidMarkup). For doing this, each project exposes only primitive and built-in types in .NET. Thus, to communicate different modules and dealing with text files, it has been use the most common types: String, TextWriter,TextReader and Stream.

See all the components working together at the main app:

using PdfGeneration.Data;
using PdfGeneration.PdfPrinting;
using PdfGeneration.Templating;
using System;

namespace PdfGeneration
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var dataProvider = new DataProvider();
            var templateRender = new TemplateRender();
            var htmlToPdfPrinter = new HtmlToPdfPrinter();
            templateRender.AddKnownType();
            var workingDirectory = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory;
            var pdfFilePath = System.IO.Path.Combine(workingDirectory, @"Report.pdf");
            var templateFilePath = System.IO.Path.Combine(workingDirectory, @"Assets/Report.html");
            var templateDirectoryPath = System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(templateFilePath);

            if (System.IO.File.Exists(pdfFilePath))
                System.IO.File.Delete(pdfFilePath);

            dynamic reportData = dataProvider.GetReportData();

            #region Printing Using Stream
            using (System.IO.Stream htmlStream = new System.IO.MemoryStream())
            {
                templateRender.RenderTemplate(templateFilePath, htmlStream, reportData, hasToLeaveStreamOpen: true);
                htmlStream.Seek(0, System.IO.SeekOrigin.Begin);
                using (var pdfStreamWriter = System.IO.File.OpenWrite(pdfFilePath))
                {
                    htmlToPdfPrinter.Print(htmlStream, pdfStreamWriter);
                }
            }
            #endregion

            //#region Printing Using StringBuilder
            //var htmlStringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
            //using (System.IO.TextWriter htmlTextWriter = new System.IO.StringWriter(htmlStringBuilder))
            //{
            //    templateRender.RenderTemplate(templateFilePath, htmlTextWriter, reportData);
            //}
            //using (var pdfStreamWriter = System.IO.File.OpenWrite(pdfFilePath))
            //{
            //    var htmlContent = htmlStringBuilder.ToString();
            //    htmlToPdfPrinter.Print(htmlContent, pdfStreamWriter);
            //}
            //#endregion

            System.Diagnostics.Process.Start(pdfFilePath);
        }
    }
}

I have to admit that this problem is very interesting to resolve and there are many alternatives, my approach strives to be simple and cheap. There are remarks which should be taken into account. Here is a simple result (without any effort on the CSS part)
MsDotNet PdfGeneration Capture

The code is at
https://github.com/hmadrigal/playground-dotnet/tree/master/MsDotNet.PdfGeneration

Happy coding!

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After moving some files my Windows Phone Project Throws a XamlParseException


I am not sure if this is an known issue for Microsoft, but at least I am aware of this. However this is the first time I am gonna document it. Since it can be very frustrating

The Problem

I want to reorganize the files in my Windows Phone Project in order to follow our implementation of MVVM, moreover we have decided that resx file will live in their own assembly project. However, once I move the Resource file to an external assembly the application just thrown an XamlParseException even though the reference in XAML is totally correct.

REMARKS
XamlParseExceptions may be thrown by other reasons. It is important to realize that I knew I moved the RESX file to a different assembly and before that everything was working. Certainly I updated the reference to the new assembly, and the exception was still being thrown. That is why this is a tricky issue.

The solution

It took some time to me to noticed, but somehow the project that contains the RESX file cannot contain a dot (.) character in its assembly name. If it happens then XAML parse will throw a XamlParserException even though the reference to the assembly is correct. The error message may contain something like this:

System.Windows.Markup.XamlParseException occurred
  HResult=-2146233087
  Message=Unknown parser error: Scanner 2147500037. [Line: 10 Position: 126]
  Source=System.Windows
  LineNumber=10
  LinePosition=126
  StackTrace:
       at System.Windows.Application.LoadComponent(Object component, Uri resourceLocator)
       at MyApp.App.InitializeComponent()
       at MyApp.App..ctor()
  InnerException: 

Taking a look at the location where I was loading the Resource it was this:

<Application
    x:Class="MyApp.App"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:phone="clr-namespace:Microsoft.Phone.Controls;assembly=Microsoft.Phone"
    xmlns:shell="clr-namespace:Microsoft.Phone.Shell;assembly=Microsoft.Phone">

    <!--Application Resources-->
    <Application.Resources>
        <local:LocalizedStrings xmlns:local="clr-namespace:MyApp;assembly=MyApp.WindowsPhone8.Resources" x:Key="LocalizedStrings"/>
    </Application.Resources>

    <Application.ApplicationLifetimeObjects>
        <!--Required object that handles lifetime events for the application-->
        <shell:PhoneApplicationService
            Launching="Application_Launching" Closing="Application_Closing"
            Activated="Application_Activated" Deactivated="Application_Deactivated"/>
    </Application.ApplicationLifetimeObjects>

</Application>

The line one of my projects generates an assembly named: ‘MyApp.WindowsPhone8.Resources’, in order to resolve the issue I only have to update the generated assembly name to be ‘MyApp_WindowsPhone8_Resources’ and then update the proper reference in the XAML. For example:

        <local:LocalizedStrings xmlns:local="clr-namespace:MyApp;assembly=MyApp_WindowsPhone8_Resources" x:Key="LocalizedStrings"/>

After performing this change your app should work normally.

Automatic retries using the Transient Fault Handling from Enterprise libraries (EntLib)


Hello,

I was reading about the Transient Fault Handling at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh680901(v=pandp.50).aspx This is a block of the Enterprise Libraries which is part of the Enterprise Integration Pack for Windows Azure. I haven’t played much with Azure yet, but one part of the documentation took my attention:

When Should You Use the Transient Fault Handling Application Block?
…… (some explanation about when you are using Azure services) ……
You Are Using a Custom Service
If your application uses a custom service, it can still benefit from using the Transient Fault Handling Application Block. You can author a custom detection strategy for your service that encapsulates your knowledge of which transient exceptions may result from a service invocation. The Transient Fault Handling Application Block then provides you with the framework for defining retry policies and for wrapping your method calls so that the application block applies the retry logic.Source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh680901(v=pandp.50).aspx#sec10

So, I thought why do I have to write always the retry logic if this is already done ;-).

The problem

We want to write a generic retry mechanism for our application. Moreover we need to support some level of customization thru configuration files.

The solution
Simple let set up the Transient Fault Handling Block (from now on FHB). First of fall you will have to download the libraries, you could do it using NuGet – which by default adds also references to support Windows Azure -. You can remove the Windows Azure DLL if you’re not going to be using Windows Azure in your app.

The FHB lets you specify a error detection strategy as well as retry strategy when you construct the retry policy. Also, a Retry policy support the execution of Action, Funcdelegates or Actionfor async retries.

As part of the configuration process for FHB, it’s required to indicate which errors should be handled by FHB. A mechanism for doing this is by implementing the interface: ITransientErrorDetectionStrategy. In our sample, we only want to retry when a FileNotFoundException is thrown. Thus we have coded the FileSystemTransientErrorDetectionStrategy:

using System;
using System.IO;
using Microsoft.Practices.TransientFaultHandling;

namespace SampleConsoleApplication.TransientErrors.Strategies
{
    public class FileSystemTransientErrorDetectionStrategy : ITransientErrorDetectionStrategy
    {
        #region ITransientErrorDetectionStrategy Members

        public bool IsTransient(Exception ex)
        {
            return ex is FileNotFoundException;
        }

        #endregion
    }
}

Certainly you could implement it by handling any particular exception.
Now we need to define a retry policy. This is done by specifying a retry strategy. The following code example configures a retry policy by providing a retry strategy incremental. Additionally in our sample service.DoSlowAndImportantTask will always fail, so the FHB will retry automatically based on the retry policy.

 private static void RetryPolityUsingCode(IUnityContainer container, IService service, OutputWriterService writer)
        {
            writer.WriteLine("Begin sample: RetryPolityUsingCode");
            // Define your retry strategy: retry 5 times, starting 1 second apart
            // and adding 2 seconds to the interval each retry.
            var retryStrategy = new Incremental(5, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1), TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2));

            // Define your retry policy using the retry strategy and the Windows Azure storage
            // transient fault detection strategy.
            var retryPolicy = new RetryPolicy(retryStrategy);

            try
            {
                // Do some work that may result in a transient fault.
                retryPolicy.ExecuteAction(service.DoSlowAndImportantTask);
            }
            catch (Exception exception)
            {
                // All the retries failed.
                writer.WriteLine("An Exception has been thrown:\n{0}", exception);
            }
            writer.WriteLine("End sample: RetryPolityUsingCode");
        }

Additionally it’s possible to specify the retry policy in the configuration file, for example:

<!--?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?-->

<section name="RetryPolicyConfiguration" type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.WindowsAzure.TransientFaultHandling.Configuration.RetryPolicyConfigurationSettings, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.WindowsAzure.TransientFaultHandling" requirepermission="true"></section><section name="typeRegistrationProvidersConfiguration" type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Common.Configuration.TypeRegistrationProvidersConfigurationSection, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Common"></section>

Please notice that there is a default Retry Strategy indicating that will use “Fixed Interval Retry Strategy”. Our C# code will ask for the RetryManager instance in order to retrieve the Retry Policy and then perform the task.

private static void RetryPolityUsingConfigFile(IUnityContainer container, IService service, OutputWriterService writer)
        {
            writer.WriteLine("Begin sample: RetryPolityUsingConfigFile");
            // Gets the current Retry Manager configuration
            var retryManager = EnterpriseLibraryContainer.Current.GetInstance();

            // Asks for the default Retry Policy. Keep on mind that it's possible to ask for an specific one.
            var retryPolicy = retryManager.GetRetryPolicy();
            try
            {
                // Do some work that may result in a transient fault.
                retryPolicy.ExecuteAction(service.DoSlowAndImportantTask);
            }
            catch (Exception exception)
            {
                // All the retries failed.
                writer.WriteLine("An Exception has been thrown:\n{0}", exception);
            }
            writer.WriteLine("End sample: RetryPolityUsingConfigFile");
        }

The Transient Fault Handling Block a simple and flexible alternative for a well-known task. A automatic retry system, moreover this supports configuration file, so we should be able to change the retry policy just by modifying our configuration file.

Here is an screen shot of the app, which automatically retries calling our mischievous method.

Transient Fault Handling Tries Output Capture

As usual the code sample is at https://github.com/hmadrigal/playground-dotnet/tree/master/MsEntLib.TransientErrorHandling

How to create a plug in using C# .NET (4.0) and MEF


Hello,

Long time ago I wrote my approach of how to write a plugin (add in) using Microsoft Unity (http://unity.codeplex.com/). In my old approach (https://hmadrigal.wordpress.com/2010/03/28/writing-a-plug-in/) was using the unity.config file to load dynamically the plugins. Certainly the major issue with this approach it’s that you will have to update your unity.config file every time you add a new plugin.

As usual there is a code sample of all this at:
https://github.com/hmadrigal/playground-dotnet/tree/master/MsDotNet.PluginWithMEF The code runs in MonoDevelop as well as in Visual Studio.

On this post I’ll explain how to easily use Microsoft Extensibility Framework (MEF) http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd460648.aspx to load plugins from a directory. Additionally MEF is a framework to create plugins and extensible applications, so it supports more operations other than loading types from external assemblies.

The problem

I want to load different language implementations provided in different assemblies. So, each DLL might (or might not) contain an implementation of a supported language. Moreover, the assemblies can be implemented by third party members, so I cannot binding them into my project at compile time.

The Solution

Defining what on my application needs to be extensible
Define a common contract in order to identify a class which provided a supported language. Moreover all the “extensible” portion of your application should be encapsulated into a simple assembly that could be redistributed to other developers who wants to implement the plugin.
BTW, when implementing plug ins, it’s normal to define a contract (or interface) which defines the required functionality.I’ll be using the word “part” when I’m talking about contract or interfaces.
The project MefAddIns.Extensibility defines an interface which can be used to provide a supported language.

namespace MefAddIns.Extensibility
{
    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Text;
    /// <summary>
    /// Defines the functionality that third parties have to implement for my language plug in
    /// </summary>
    public interface ISupportedLanguage
    {
        string Author { get; }
        string Version { get; }
        string Description { get; }
        string Name { get; }
    }
}

Implementing the plug in
Now it’s the time to provide implementation of supported languages. Each project of MefAddIns.Language.English, MefAddIns.Language.Japanese and MefAddIns.Language.Spanish provides at least one implementation for the interface ISupportedLanguage. These projects could be developed internally or by third party people. An example of this implementation is:

namespace MefAddIns.Language.English
{
    using MefAddIns.Extensibility;
    using System.ComponentModel.Composition;

    /// <summary>
    /// Provides an implementation of a supported language by implementing ISupportedLanguage.
    /// Moreover it uses Export attribute to make it available thru MEF framework.
    /// </summary>
    [Export(typeof(ISupportedLanguage))]
    public class EnglishLanguage : ISupportedLanguage
    {
        public string Author
        {
            get { return @"Herberth Madrigal"; }
        }
        public string Version
        {
            get { return @"EN-US.1.0.0"; }
        }
        public string Description
        {
            get { return "This is the English language pack."; }
        }
        public string Name
        {
            get { return @"English"; }
        }
    }
}

Please note that the attribute Export indicates to MEF framework that the class EnglishLanguage can be used when a ISupportedLanguage is requested. In other words, if any other application is looking for a part ISupportedLanguage then MEF framework will suggest EnglishLanguage. In further steps we are going to create a MEF catalog which is the mechanism to associate exported parts with the members which need to import parts.

Defining the parts that my application needs to import
The simplest way of doing this with MEF is by using the import attribute. On this case I’ll be using ImportMany because of I’ll be expecting many (0 or more) implementations of the ISupportedLanguage interface. For example:

namespace MefAddIns.Terminal
{
    using MefAddIns.Extensibility;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.ComponentModel.Composition;

    public class Bootstrapper
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Holds a list of all the valid languages for this application
        /// </summary>
        [ImportMany]
        public IEnumerable<ISupportedLanguage> Languages { get; set; }

    }
}

Composing your objects by using (MEF) catalogs
Before getting into details I’ll like to point out some concepts:

Part: It’s the portion of our code that can be exported or imported.
Export: It’s the fact of indicating that a portion of our code is available and it fits a set of traits. E.g. EnglishLanguage implements the ISupportedLanguage Interface, thus I can add the attribute Export(typeof(ISupportedLanguage)).
Import: It’s the fact of indicating that a portion of our code requires a part that fits a set of traits. E.g. I need to import a give language, then I define a property of ISupportedLanguage type and set the attribute Import(typeof(ISupportedLanguage)).
Catalog: It a source of Exports and Import definitions. It could be the current execution context or a set of binaries files (such as dlls, exes).
Container: It’s an module which deals with class instantiation. This item uses the catalog when needed in order to create the instances during the composition process.
Composition: It’s the fact of taking an object and making sure that all its needs regarding imports are fulfilled. Certainly this will depends on the catalogs and the export and imports that are being used on the catalog.

Now, that we now more about come MEF concepts. Lets talk more about MEF in our example. MEF detects that some code is Exporting parts, and other code is Importing. The process of loading the parts is made by creating a catalog. There are many ways of creating catalogs, on my example is using a DictionaryCatalog. The DictionaryCatalog uses a directory to look for files, and it creates a catalog with all the exported parts from the assemblies (or files) of the given directory. Finally our application creates an instance of the Bootstrapper class, this instance indicates that it requires all the possible instances of ISupportedLanguages that are into the DictionaryCatalog. Here is a sample of this:

namespace MefAddIns.Terminal
{
    using System.ComponentModel.Composition.Hosting;
    using System.ComponentModel.Composition;
    using System;

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var bootStrapper = new Bootstrapper();

            //An aggregate catalog that combines multiple catalogs
            var catalog = new AggregateCatalog();
            //Adds all the parts found in same directory where the application is running!
            var currentPath = System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(System.Reflection.Assembly.GetAssembly(typeof(Program)).Location);
            catalog.Catalogs.Add(new DirectoryCatalog(currentPath));

            //Create the CompositionContainer with the parts in the catalog
            var _container = new CompositionContainer(catalog);

            //Fill the imports of this object
            try
            {
                _container.ComposeParts(bootStrapper);
            }
            catch (CompositionException compositionException)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(compositionException.ToString());
            }

            //Prints all the languages that were found into the application directory
            var i = 0;
            foreach (var language in bootStrapper.Languages)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("[{0}] {1} by {2}.\n\t{3}\n", language.Version, language.Name, language.Author, language.Description);
                i++;
            }
            Console.WriteLine("It has been found {0} supported languages",i);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

    }
}

Now that we have all that our application requires, we’re able to run the app and see the following output:

Example of the output where it lists all the supported languages

Hey It’s not printing anything!!!
Ok. There is an additional thing to talk, which it’s not strictly related to MEF. As your might noticed our sample application does not have references to any of the MefAddIns.Language.* Dlls but it’s running code from them. Here is the deal, since our application uses MEF we don’t need to reference directly these DLLS, we just need to copy them into the directory where the DirectoryCatalog is going to look for them. The code sample looks into the directory where the application is running, so we have configured our main csproj to copy the DLLS to the output directory of our main application.
To keep it simple, you can do it in two steps 😉
1) Add the external DLLs into your project. First, Right click on your main project, and click on “Add existing item…”. Look for the DLL, and select “Add as a Link”. The configure the properties of the added file to copy always or copy when newer.
2) Update the csproj file. Right click on your project, and the select “Unload project”. Then once again right click on your project and select “Edit xxxxx.csproj”. This will open the project as an XML file. Look for the added DLL, and replace part of portions of the path for MSBuild variables such as $(Configuration). Note that there are more options to do this, such as using the Copy task from MSBuild (see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/266888/msbuild-copy-output-from-another-project-into-the-output-of-the-current-project ). In our sample this was enough because we are looking for DLLs into the current directory, but depending on your file structure this won’t be recommended.

<ItemGroup>
    <Content Include="
..\MefAddIns.Language.English\bin\$(Configuration)\MefAddIns.Language.English.dll;
..\MefAddIns.Language.Japanese\bin\$(Configuration)\MefAddIns.Language.Japanese.dll;
..\MefAddIns.Language.Spanish\bin\$(Configuration)\MefAddIns.Language.Spanish.dll;">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>PreserveNewest</CopyToOutputDirectory>
      <Visible>false</Visible>
    </Content>
  </ItemGroup>

At last comment, this is the most basic sample of using MEF to create a plugin-based structure. There are more things to consider , e.g. the path where your DLLs are going to be placed or how your main application is going to exchange information with the plugins. MEF has also more options to create extensible applications. Also, it’s important to consider when it’s good to create plugin based architectures rather that tightly coupled apps.

EDIT In my last update I modified the project (csproj) to make it run on MonoDevelop ;-). The major change is that some tasks on MSBuild aren’t available in XBuild. So, the last step which modified the csproject, now looks like:

<ItemGroup Condition=" '$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Debug|AnyCPU' ">
    <Content Include="..\MefAddIns.Language.English\bin\Debug\MefAddIns.Language.English.dll">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>PreserveNewest</CopyToOutputDirectory>
      <Visible>False</Visible>
    </Content>
    <Content Include="..\MefAddIns.Language.Japanese\bin\Debug\MefAddIns.Language.Japanese.dll">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>PreserveNewest</CopyToOutputDirectory>
      <Visible>False</Visible>
    </Content>
    <Content Include="..\MefAddIns.Language.Spanish\bin\Debug\MefAddIns.Language.Spanish.dll">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>PreserveNewest</CopyToOutputDirectory>
      <Visible>False</Visible>
    </Content>
  </ItemGroup>
  <ItemGroup Condition=" '$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Release|AnyCPU' ">
    <Content Include="..\MefAddIns.Language.English\bin\Release\MefAddIns.Language.English.dll">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>PreserveNewest</CopyToOutputDirectory>
      <Visible>False</Visible>
    </Content>
    <Content Include="..\MefAddIns.Language.Japanese\bin\Release\MefAddIns.Language.Japanese.dll">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>PreserveNewest</CopyToOutputDirectory>
      <Visible>False</Visible>
    </Content>
    <Content Include="..\MefAddIns.Language.Spanish\bin\Release\MefAddIns.Language.Spanish.dll">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>PreserveNewest</CopyToOutputDirectory>
      <Visible>False</Visible>
    </Content>
  </ItemGroup>

The code sample for this application is at:
https://github.com/hmadrigal/playground-dotnet/tree/master/MsDotNet.PluginWithMEF

Best regards,
Herber

Unity 2 Setting up the Chain of Responsability pattern and using a configuration file with Mono (monodevelop)


Unity 2 Setting up the Chain of Responsability pattern and using a configuration file with Mono (monodevelop)

The Chain of Responsibility pattern helps to accomplish two main goals when developing software. It keeps very specific
functionality into separate modules, and by using unity we can decide easily plug and unplug functionality.

If you haven’t heard about Chain of Responsibility pattern see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chain-of-responsibility_pattern, on the other hand, if you haven’t heard about Microsoft Unity 2 Block (an IoC or dependency injection framework, please check http://unity.codeplex.com/.

Now, lets get started with a simple sample.

1. Get Microsoft Unity 2 Block
I’m going to use mono just to show that it’s possible to use Unity on Mono ;-). So, first of all download Unity Source code from codeplex site at http://unity.codeplex.com/SourceControl/list/changesets# . Once you download the source code, you can remove tests and the compile the project. it should compile properly. (BTW I’m using Mono 2.4)

2. In our sample, the application uses repositories, to get and store user data. Our sample has create a project per layer, and these projects communicate by implementing the interfaces (contracts) from the Infrastructure project. Lets see some notes about each layer.

  • “Data” project will retrieve real data from the data base.
  • “Dummy” project will produce dummy data.
  • “Cache” project will perform cache tasks, and then delegate the data retrival tasks to a given sucessor.
  • “Logging” project will perform logging tasks, and then delegate the data retrival to a give successor.
  • “Infrastructure” project will define the interface that is required for the UserRepository. So all projects knows what is the expected input and output for the UserRepository. Additionally it has been define a ISuccessor interface in order to identify layers that require a successor (for example Logging, Cache).

For the sake of the sample, the IUserRepository defines only one operation GetUserFullName. In this opertion, each implementation will add a text indicating that it has been performed a call to each given layer. By using unity 2 we will be able to indicate which levels will be loaded and executed through a configuration file.

using System;
namespace ChainOfResponsability.Infrastructure.Repository
{
	public interface IUserRepository
	{
		string GetUserFullName(int id);
	}
}

This code is sample of the contract that each different layer is going to implement if they want to be part of the chain for IUserRepository.
Additionally, ISuccessor is defined as following:

using System;
namespace ChainOfResponsability.Infrastructure
{
	public interface ISuccessor<T>
	{
		T Successor {get;}
	}
}

This generic interface allows to indicate a successor to perform the next call in the chain.

3. The “Logging” and “Cache” projects will implement IUserRepository and ISuccessor interfaces, and additionally they will require the successor as parameter of the constructor in order to delegate the task itself. Because of Unity 2 can only resolve one (anonymous) mapping for a given type (always into the same container). My colleague Marvin (aka Murven ) suggested a workaround. Basically, each layer which implements ISuccessor will receive in its constructor the IUnityContainer which will resolve the contract, but instead of using the given container, it will use the parent to resolve the type. So, it could get a different resolution for the same given type.

using System;
using ChainOfResponsability.Infrastructure.Repository;
using ChainOfResponsability.Infrastructure;
using ContainerExtensions = Microsoft.Practices.Unity.UnityContainerExtensions;
using Microsoft.Practices.Unity;
namespace ChainOfResponsability.Logging.Repository
{
	public class LoggingUserRespository : IUserRepository, ISuccessor<IUserRepository>
	{
		public LoggingUserRespository (IUnityContainer container)
		{
			this.Successor = ContainerExtensions.Resolve<IUserRepository> (container.Parent);
		}

		#region IUserRepository implementation
		public string GetUserFullName (int id)
		{
			return string.Format ("{0}->{1}", this.GetType ().Name, this.Successor.GetUserFullName (id));
		}
		#endregion

		#region ISuccessor[IUserRepository] implementation
		public IUserRepository Successor { get; set; }
		#endregion

	}
}
using System;
using ChainOfResponsability.Infrastructure;
using ChainOfResponsability.Infrastructure.Repository;
using Microsoft.Practices.Unity;
using ContainerExtensions = Microsoft.Practices.Unity.UnityContainerExtensions;
namespace ChainOfResponsability.Cache.Repository
{
	public class CacheUserRepository : IUserRepository, ISuccessor<IUserRepository>
	{
		public CacheUserRepository (IUnityContainer container)
		{
			this.Successor = ContainerExtensions.Resolve<IUserRepository> (container.Parent);
		}

		#region IUserRepository implementation
		public string GetUserFullName (int id)
		{
			return string.Format ("{0}->{1}", this.GetType ().Name, this.Successor.GetUserFullName (id));
		}
		#endregion

		#region ISuccessor[IUserRepository] implementation
		public IUserRepository Successor { get; set; }
		#endregion
	}
}

Even though both files owns a similar structure, each file can add a very specific functionality (caching or logging) in the previous example, and the invoke the proper successor.

4. The “Data” and “Dummy” projects will implement IUserRepository only and they will implement the task itself.

using System;
using ChainOfResponsability.Infrastructure;
using ChainOfResponsability.Infrastructure.Repository;
namespace ChainOfResponsability.Dummy.Repository
{
	public class DummyUserRepository : IUserRepository
	{
		public DummyUserRepository ()
		{
		}

		#region IUserRepository implementation
		public string GetUserFullName (int id)
		{
			return string.Format ("{0}[{1}]", this.GetType ().Name, id);
		}
		#endregion
	}
}
using System;
using ChainOfResponsability.Infrastructure;
using ChainOfResponsability.Infrastructure.Repository;
namespace ChainOfResponsability.Data.Repository
{
	public class DataUserRepository : IUserRepository
	{
		public DataUserRepository ()
		{
		}

		#region IUserRepository implementation
		public string GetUserFullName (int id)
		{
			return string.Format ("{0}[{1}]", this.GetType ().Name, id);
		}
		#endregion
	}
}

In the case of “Data” and “Dummy” layers, they don’t need a successor so they can perform the task itself and return the proper result.

6. There is an additional step, which is to load all the containers from the configuration file. Basically it’s done by looping through all the containers and asking for a new child on each iteration. So, we can create a sort of chain of containers where each one owns a different type resolution for the save given type. I’ve created an small utility which load the different containers and create a chain (container and parents).

        public static IUnityContainer container;
	private static void UnityBootStrap()
        {
            container = new UnityContainer();
            UnityConfigurationSection section = (UnityConfigurationSection)ConfigurationManager.GetSection("unity");

            #region Mappings based on the configuration file
            IUnityContainer currentContainer = container;
            foreach (var containerSection in section.Containers)
            {
                var nestedContainer = currentContainer.CreateChildContainer();
                Microsoft.Practices.Unity.Configuration.UnityContainerExtensions.LoadConfiguration(nestedContainer, section, containerSection.Name);
                currentContainer = nestedContainer;
            }
            container = currentContainer;
            #endregion
        }

This code loads the configuration file of Unity, and creates a containers which has a parent, and its parent has a different parent and so on. In this way we can create a chain with different mappings to the same IUserRepository contract. Additionally the following configuration file has been defined:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
  <configSections>
    <section name="unity" type="Microsoft.Practices.Unity.Configuration.UnityConfigurationSection, Microsoft.Practices.Unity.Configuration"/>
  </configSections>
  <unity xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/practices/2010/unity">
  	<!-- Defines some aliast to easily manipulate the mappings -->
    <alias alias="IUserRepository" type="ChainOfResponsability.Infrastructure.Repository.IUserRepository, ChainOfResponsability.Infrastructure" />
    <alias alias="DataUserRepository" type="ChainOfResponsability.Data.Repository.DataUserRepository, ChainOfResponsability.Data" />
    <alias alias="DummyUserRepository" type="ChainOfResponsability.Dummy.Repository.DummyUserRepository, ChainOfResponsability.Dummy" />
    <alias alias="CacheUserRepository" type="ChainOfResponsability.Cache.Repository.CacheUserRepository, ChainOfResponsability.Cache" />
    <alias alias="LoggingUserRespository" type="ChainOfResponsability.Logging.Repository.LoggingUserRespository, ChainOfResponsability.Logging" />

    <!-- Default Container when creating the tree-chain of resolution-->
    <container>
    </container>
    <!-- lowest level of the resolution chain -->
    <container name="DummyContainer">
      <register type="IUserRepository" mapTo="DummyUserRepository">
        <lifetime type="ContainerControlledLifetimeManager" />
      </register>
    </container>
    <container name="DataContainer">
      <register type="IUserRepository" mapTo="DataUserRepository">
        <lifetime type="ContainerControlledLifetimeManager" />
      </register>
    </container>
    <!-- Middle tiers. They can be added as many as needed, while they implement the proper interface -->
    <!-- Concrete implementations are chained because they're properly implementing ISuccessor interface -->
    <container name="CacheContainer">
      <register type="IUserRepository" mapTo="CacheUserRepository">
        <lifetime type="ContainerControlledLifetimeManager" />
      </register>
    </container>
    <!-- Chain of excution starts here! -->
    <container name="LoggingContainer">
      <register type="IUserRepository" mapTo="LoggingUserRespository">
        <lifetime type="ContainerControlledLifetimeManager" />
      </register>
    </container>
  </unity>
</configuration>

7. Because of we only have a common reference between projects (technically all projects are referencing “Infrastructure”, and some projects are referencing Unity. The final project does not need to reference all the implementations, but we have to copy the DLLs of each layer before running the application. If not, we will receive a message like:
The type name or alias …. could not be resolved. Please check your configuration file and verify this type name.” Assuming that you’ve written correctly all the types and DLLs names, then this error appears because the application couldn’t find the DLLs required to load the specified type. So, remember to copy the DLLs when running the application.

		public static void Main (string[] args)
		{
			UnityBootStrap();
			//var userRepository = Microsoft.Practices.Unity.UnityContainerExtensions.Resolve<IUserRepository>(container);
			var userRepository =  ContainerExtensions.Resolve<IUserRepository>(container);
			Console.WriteLine ("Call Stack of Layers when invoking GetUserFullName(0):\n {0} ", userRepository.GetUserFullName(0));
		}

At last but not least you can modify the configuration file to dynamically chance the layers that will be executed without changing your code. For example our first call will produce”

Calling our Sample with the Data Layer

And we can replace the “Data” layer with the “Dummy” layer just by commenting the “Data” layer definition into the configuration file.

Calling with Dummy Layer

Certainly this could open the door to more complex tasks and scenarios. The full source code of this sample has been hosted in GitHub at
https://github.com/hmadrigal/playground-dotnet/tree/master/MsUnity.ChainOfResponsability

Best regards,
Herber

Microsoft Unity2 Block and Generics into Configuration File


Hi,

I saw a question in stackoverflow about using Microsoft Unity Block to resolve generic types. At first I was surprised because I didn’t know Unity could specify Generics into the configuration file. So, after some research I realize some facts, that I’d like to share with you.

Microsoft Enterprise Libraries 5 is using Unity. The developers were planning to include a editor for the Unity Block, which was available during the beta, but it was removed from the final version. This editor is not the final, but it’s good enough to help you to write your mappings.
Sample of the Unity config file
Now we’re ready to start solving our problem of how to use Unity to resolve interfaces (or contracts) which are using generics. All this by using a configuration file. Lets take a look to the configuration file:

<pre><code><?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
  <configSections>
    <section name="unity" type="Microsoft.Practices.Unity.Configuration.UnityConfigurationSection, Microsoft.Practices.Unity.Configuration"/>
  </configSections>
  <unity xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/practices/2010/unity">
    <alias alias="StringListContract" type="System.Collections.Generic.IList`1[[System.String, mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089]], mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089" />
    <alias alias="ConcreteStringList" type="System.Collections.Generic.List`1[[System.String, mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089]], mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089" />
    <container>
      <register type="StringListContract" mapTo="ConcreteStringList">
        <lifetime type="ContainerControlledLifetimeManager" />
        <constructor />
      </register>
    </container>
  </unity>
</configuration></code></pre>

As you can see, configuration is simple. A quick note is that when it’s registered the type resolution IList => List. This resolution specifies a default default constructor. This is because of Unity block cannot determine the best constructor for the List. Additionally this sample is using signed dlls, so the references of IList, List and String are signed.

The last part of this sample, is consuming this configuration file.

<pre><code>using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.Practices.Unity;
using Microsoft.Practices.Unity.Configuration;
namespace UnityTerminal
{


    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var container = new UnityContainer();
            container.LoadConfiguration();
            {
                var concreteStringList = container.Resolve<System.Collections.Generic.IList<System.String>>();
                concreteStringList.Add("Hello World");
            }
            {
                var concreteStringList = container.Resolve<System.Collections.Generic.IList<System.String>>();
                Console.WriteLine("{0}", concreteStringList[0]);
            }
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}</code></pre>

So, by doing this the first call to resolve will retrieve resolve the type based on the configuration file, the second call is used to verify the implemented behavior by printing the previous stored value.

Best regards,
Herber